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Argentum's blog, Marketing Op-Ed highlights interesting, real-world examples of marketing with a little bit of opinion thrown in.  It's written by Susan Silver, President of Argentum Strategy Group, with the occasional guest blogger added to the mix.

It's updated once a month, and we would love to hear what you think!



   
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Top 10 Entrepreneurial Research Mistakes, Part 3: Care & Feeding of Your Respondents

Thursday, July 24, 2014   0 Comments - General Marketing,Research  

This is the third and final part of our series on the Top 10 Entrepreneurial Research Mistakes. Use these links to read Part 1, Which Methodology to Use and Part 2, Asking Smart Questions.

The series came out of a workshop we developed to help the entrepreneurs at 1871 be smarter about the market research they were conducting without the help of research professionals.

After years of working with entrepreneurs in the Chicago area, the most common research mistakes I encounter fall into three main camps:
– Research methodology selection
– The questions asked and the answer choices provided
– The care & feeding of respondents/participants

Today’s post covers the third of the three categories: The care & feeding of your respondent, which is really all about respecting your respondents’ time and limitations.

8. Asking unqualified respondents to predict the future
Don’t ask broad and forward-looking questions of all respondents, such as: “What skillsets will be the most valuable to technology job seekers within the next five years?”

Instead maybe ask something grounded in what the respondent might actually have direct, credible knowledge. An example of this is: “What technology jobs is your company currently having a hard time filling?” Another example is: “What new technology positions will your company be adding next year?”
Read More -›

Top 10 Entrepreneurial Research Mistakes, Part 2: Asking Smart Questions

Tuesday, June 24, 2014   0 Comments - General Marketing,Research  

As we mentioned in our Part 1 post in April, being an entrepreneur sometimes feels like you’re playing the guitar while you’ve got a tambourine on top of your head, a harmonica in your mouth, and cymbals between your knees.

Because of this, there are a lot of things that entrepreneurial companies try doing themselves, even if they’ve never done it before. Customer and market research is often one of these areas.

Because most entrepreneurial companies are not in a position to hire a market research professional, earlier this year we created a basic how-to research class for 1871, Chicago’s tech incubator: Top Ten Research Mistakes Made By Entrepreneurs.

The most common research mistakes I encounter fall into three main camps:
– Research methodology selection
– The questions asked and the answer choices provided
– The care & feeding of respondents/participants

Today’s post covers the second of the three categories: Questions & Answers

Mistakes #3-7
3. Asking “nice-to-know” questions
Don’t squander the opportunity when someone has actually agreed to speak with you. Make sure you only take up their valuable time with your must-know questions. You’ll know it’s a need-to-know question if you can clearly articulate what the answer will enable you and your company to do differently.
Read More -›

Best Marketing Job Spec EVER

Friday, May 2, 2014   0 Comments - General Marketing  

As someone who has been involved with marketing in some way for more than 20 years, I have seen a whole lot of marketing job specs in my time.

Without a doubt the VP of Marketing job spec that GiveForward post last week is the best I have ever seen. And it’s not just my opinion. I posted the job to my LinkedIn network and have never seen more enthusiasm for a job posting, including:
- Too bad I’m not a marketing person, I want this job!
– Love this job, wish it were in Baltimore!
– Best job spec I have ever read
– Now THIS is how you write a job spec

Not only does the spec clearly lay out the obligatory qualifications the company is looking for, more importantly it clearly communicates the personality and culture of the organization. Tellingly, it starts with an “About You” section that has nothing to do with qualifications and everything to do with the kind of human being they want to join the GiveForward team. Read More -›